Personification: Part Deux

THE TRENCHES

The second personification project is depicting poems of World War I. We are given the freedom to choose between Dulce Et Decorum Est (1) by Wilfred Owen and The Hollow Men by T.S. Eliot.

Before making my decision on which poem I will be depicting, I researched facts and history of World War I. The war began in 1914 and ended in 1918 in Europe. It was started with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife by the Serbian act of terrorism. The war involved two most powerful influence in the world, the Alliances (British empire, France, Russia, Italy, Japan and the U.S) and The Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey & Bulgaria).

Fifteen million people were killed and twenty million troops were wounded. The trenches network stretched approximately 25,000 miles from the english channel to Switzerland. It was invested with rats, frogs and lice not to mentioned diseases like dysentery, typhus, cholera, gang green on wounds which slowly killed soldiers and influenza epidemic. The war was also the first war that used chemical weapon (chlorine gas) which also known as mustard gas.

The war left thousand of soldiers disfigured and disabled but also with horrific face disfigurement. The war ended with the The Treaty of Versailles. The war left Britain with huge debts, high unemployment and slow growth of economy. Britain lost its power in the leadership of the world and lost its sense of cavalry, heroism and nationalism and had driven Germany into deep recession. The war is also known as The War to end all war.

Source: http://facts.randomhistory.com/world-war-i-facts.html

I decided to depict Wilfred Owen’s poem because the poem was written based on his experience as a troop in the WW I. It described what he saw, experienced and felt vividly. He suffered from shell-shock and fever which encouraged him in writing the poem. He was shot and killed in the war, seven days before it ended.

Source: http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/englit/owen/

CASTING 

Choosing paint tubes as soldiers was quite a straight decision. Its paper wrap and cap made them look like soldiers in their uniform and helmets. The shape and type also helped me in creating characters of the soldiers.

casting the soldiers

casting the soldiers

casting paramedic/nurse/doc

casting paramedic/nurse/doc

I chose to cast pizza cutter as paramedic/doc/nurses because I think that the round blade represents the mobility of the paramedic/doctors and nurses.

Bellow is my scenes set-up based on the poem:

looking

looking

inside the trenches

inside the trenches

shot!

shot!

the departed

the departed

marching

marching

the departed view from the top

the departed view from the top

the departed _top view close-up

the departed _top view close-up

lost a friend

lost a friend

invected lung!

infected lung!

The above sets had helped me in creating possible scenes ( in thumbnails) for the trenches book.

wounded

wounded

writing home

writing home

marching

marching

wounded

wounded

wounded

wounded

Thumbnails memories

Thumbnails memories

Thumbnails

Thumbnails

Thumbnails

Thumbnails

colour

colour

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2 Comments on “Personification: Part Deux”

  1. Amelia says:

    Ayu,

    the images are beautifully realised really capturing the feeling and tempo in the trenches from the poem.

    The paint tubes were a splendid idea!
    Well done on such a thorough exciting and storytelling-full blog.

    Amelia

  2. […] set of WWI trenches so that we can get better understanding of the feel and emotions of the poem. The set or ‘stage’ has also helped us to look at different point of views in narrating the poem by using camera to […]


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