Dyffryn House project

I had the opportunity to participate in a Story room project by Dyffryn House and Garden in Cardiff. Story room project is to feature the story of Cory family who owned the house before National Trust took it over. My project is focusing on Florence Cory story. She is well-known for her philanthropy works and musical talent as well as having a high-end fashion sense. Newspaper articles issued in Georgian era about social events that she attended gave me ideas to create a drawing-stitch mix media piece. The piece was exhibited from 23rd March for a month.

As requested by Dyffryn House, this piece is going to be exhibited in Florence Cory’s room permanently.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.

© Ayu Baker, 2015. Dyffryn house exhibition. Florence Cory.


FGM

These are the images I produced based on sketches I made on the topic of FGM.

© Ayu Baker, 2014. FGM. Flower-Tree

© Ayu Baker, 2014. FGM-1. Flower-Tree

This drawing (FGM-1) is inspired from Frida Kahlo’s (1907-1954) self portrait with Thorn Necklace and hummingbird. Her self portrait is deeply personal and full of symbols. In my drawing, the orange Lilies symbolises hate (based on Hanakotoba flower symbolism). The hate is by people who oppressed female and not acknowledging their rights and equality. While the tree symbolises how the practice of FGM has been forced toward women & young girls through the centuries.

© Ayu Baker, 2014. FGM.

© Ayu Baker, 2014. FGM-2.

The second drawing (FGM-2) is inspired by Louis Bourgeois’ Maman (1999). Maman is French for Mummy. Her spider sculpture was made of bronze, stainless steel and marble. The sculpture is deeply personal and refer to her childhood memories of a loving yet complicit mother. The spider symbolised as a protector and predator. The spider silk is used to make cocoon and also to bind prey. I feel that mothers who allowed or even forced their daughters to suffer from FGM have a similar behaviour with spider.


Kaplan images

I’m practicing the language of flower in this project as well. The project is intended to produce images to be submitted for Kaplan Lawyer/Solicitor office’s annual calendar. I did not submit my images because I think I was not putting myself 100% on this project and as the result I’m not happy with the end product.

 

 

 

 

 


Female Genital Mutilation

Applying visual language onto world issue is one project that I enjoyed and still carry on. My topic is about female genital mutilation.

Artist Ref : Louise Burguois & Kiki Smith

sketches inspired by the above artists:

Artist ref : David Hockney & Anthony Green


An Image could change the text

I remember what Sue Coe said in a seminar last year in Falmouth Uni, she reminded artists to keep asking question to themselves: ‘the content of your work — what can you show in art that is now shown? What is important to say at this time? What is your mission? What is your passionate about? The Visual Language module made me think of what I’ve been trying to express in my work, my technique, the process and approach.

I’m finding my language through empathy, by putting my feet on someone else’s shoes and by living someone else’s live. An illustration must have stance, context, content and what impact it is trying to convey. I’m approaching it through metaphor. A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest resemblance, a symbol. 

My first practice is by using the language of flower. I referred to a work by an American artist John Singer Sargent in 1885 – Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose. The artwork can be read a botanical symbol of flower-girls, with subtle sexual hint of lighting a lantern (slang in French for vagina), and the taper as a symbolic paintbrush (also used to hand-pollinate flowers) used to illuminate the paper of the lantern in the same way that a painter uses a paintbrush to create an image on a canvas.

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose 1885-6 by John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) -http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/sargent-carnation-lily-lily-rose-n01615 date January 16th, 2015

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose 1885-6 by John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) -http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/sargent-carnation-lily-lily-rose-n01615 date January 16th, 2015

So, to understand a little bit more about flower symbols, I researched the flower anatomy and meanings whether based on belief, colour or origin(i.e. Japanese language of flower – Hanakotoba).

©Ayu Baker, 2015. Flower Anatomy

©Ayu Baker, 2015. Flower Anatomy